ИOT2BЯÖKE2FiX

Risky Business Blog

ИOT2BЯÖKE2FiX added 2 new photos.

Now you too can look like a hero! Order one of my shirts and display your power! $12 each.
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Now you too can look like a hero! Order one of my shirts and display your power! $12 each.

When a computer kept crashing, I had no choice but to unplug it and perform a double bypass ram-surgery. ... See MoreSee Less

When a computer kept crashing, I had no choice but to unplug it and perform a double bypass ram-surgery.

ИOT2BЯÖKE2FiX added a new photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Be careful with your personal data! Over the last few days, the internet has seen hundreds of reports of people burglarized electronically via a path they didn't foresee - TeamViewer.

The ubiquitous remote desktop application has been used by criminals to empty scores of bank accounts and send themselves money via paypal. How is this possible? If you get access to a person's TeamViewer account, you can remotely control any computer connected to that account, which means you can do anything they can do - like open their browser, navigate to paypal, and wire yourself money via their bank.

Consider this for a moment. They don't know your passwords, but with access to YOUR browser, they gain access to YOUR Paypal account. How? Because you've opted to save your password information in your browser - every time you go to Paypal, you're logged in automatically. This isn't really an issue until you consider someone could (virtually) sit down in front of your computer and use it without your knowledge.

After reading about this, I suddenly realized I use an app called Keepass to organize my passwords. This program uses a master password to open a database of all your passwords and login information, and by default will stay open forever until you close it. The result is what you see in the image - sitting there on my desktop. It is protected by a very complex password that is easy for me to remember, but if it's open and I'm not there and someone hacks into my computer, every last password I've created - and I have literally hundreds of accounts across the internet - will be exposed. The program can be set to lock the database-in-use automatically if I log off or even if the program goes unused for a specific period of time - or even if it is minimized (all options). I've set those options in the past, but then if I reinstalled Windows and had to reinstall Keepass, I sometimes forget to change those settings.

It has caused me to rethink my security standards... especially after I noticed the red camera LED on my laptop *ON* without me doing anything (or having any camera-related program running). A malware scan revealed nothing, but if someone just logged on without authorization to steal whatever personal data they could, not much of a trace would be left behind - except possibly an empty bank account. Something to think about.
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Be careful with your personal data!  Over the last few days, the internet has seen hundreds of reports of people burglarized electronically via a path they didnt foresee - TeamViewer.  

The ubiquitous remote desktop application has been used by criminals to empty scores of bank accounts and send themselves money via paypal.  How is this possible?  If you get access to a persons TeamViewer account, you can remotely control any computer connected to that account, which means you can do anything they can do - like open their browser, navigate to paypal, and wire yourself money via their bank.

Consider this for a moment.  They dont know your passwords, but with access to YOUR browser, they gain access to YOUR Paypal account.  How?  Because youve opted to save your password information in your browser - every time you go to Paypal, youre logged in automatically.  This isnt really an issue until you consider someone could (virtually) sit down in front of your computer and use it without your knowledge.

After reading about this, I suddenly realized I use an app called Keepass to organize my passwords.  This program uses a master password to open a database of all your passwords and login information, and by default will stay open forever until you close it.  The result is what you see in the image - sitting there on my desktop.  It is protected by a very complex password that is easy for me to remember, but if its open and Im not there and someone hacks into my computer, every last password Ive created - and I have literally hundreds of accounts across the internet - will be exposed.  The program can be set to lock the database-in-use automatically if I log off or even if the program goes unused for a specific period of time - or even if it is minimized (all options).  Ive set those options in the past, but then if I reinstalled Windows and had to reinstall Keepass, I sometimes forget to change those settings.

It has caused me to rethink my security standards... especially after I noticed the red camera LED on my laptop *ON* without me doing anything (or having any camera-related program running).  A malware scan revealed nothing, but if someone just logged on without authorization to steal whatever personal data they could, not much of a trace would be left behind - except possibly an empty bank account.  Something to think about.

Larry Joy likes this

Larry JoyThanks for the update cuz

1 year ago
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